Celebrating the cotton heritage legacy materials of collaborating community groups

The Global Cotton Connections project is delighted to celebrate the production of key cotton heritage legacy materials by its community based collaborators, the Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group, facilitated by Bright Ideas Nottingham, and the Sheffield Hindu Samaj heritage group.

The Nottingham Slave Trade Legacies group, made up of Nottingham people of mainly African Caribbean heritage backgrounds, has produced a short film, entitled Global Cotton Connections – Untangling the Threads of Slavery. In this thought-provoking film members of the group reflect on their learning journey as they came to know more about cotton histories and the entanglements with slavery and, through their visits to Derbyshire, how these stories were told in the Derwent Valley mills.
STL film graphicA free copy of the film, can be accessed directly on Youtube:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2QmVmXqP6g

The film can also be found alongside a second film made by the group as part of its Heritage Lottery funded project, ‘The Colour of Money’, on the Slave Trade Legacies blog: https://slavetradelegacies.wordpress.com/time-line-our-year-the-colour-of-money/

Earlier versions of the film were shown in March 2015 at the Slave Trade Legacies, Colour of Money, celebration event at the Broadway Cinema, organised by Bright Ideas Nottingham, and at the Global Cotton Connections International Cotton Workshop held in Nottingham in April 2015. The final version was screened at the AHRC Connected Communities Festival events hosted by the Global Cotton Connections project and Slave Trade Legacies group at Cromford Mills, Derbyshire on Saturday 20th June 2015. We hope the film will be shown more widely in the future in mill heritage venues in the Derwent Valley.

The Sheffield Hindu Samaj cultural group is a Hindu faith group made up of Sheffield people of mainly Indian heritage backgrounds. Drawing on both its involvement in the Global Cotton Connections project and its previous Heritage Lottery Fund project, entitled ‘British Raj in the Peak District’, it has produced two key cotton heritage legacy outputs. The first is a rich collection of poetry, entitled British Raj in the Peak District: Threads of Connection, edited by a member of the group, Debjani Chatterjee.

Front cover Poetry CollectionThe poems in the volume are written by members of the group, many of whom attended writing workshops in the summer of 2014, run by Debjani and funded by the Global Cotton Connections project. The collection was launched at the AHRC Connected Communities Festival events hosted by the Global Cotton Connections project and the Sheffield Hindu Samaj heritage group at Cromford Mills Derbyshire on Saturday 20th June 2015. Free copies were distributed to audience members at the poetry reading events. Further copies are available while stocks last at Cromford Mills and Belper North Mill Trust Museum or from the Sheffield Hindu Samaj.

Hindu Samaj leaflet view 1

The second is a leaflet of three Indian Heritage Walks in the Peak District, one of which is a cotton route focused on Calver, Cromford and Belper mills. The leaflet design and script was led by Chamu Kuppuswamy, a volunteer ranger with the Peak District National Park as well as Hindu Samaj member, with production input from the Peak District National Park design team. Free copies of the leaflets are available in a range of Peak District and Derbyshire venues, including Cromford and Belper Mills, while stocks last.

Funding for the production of the above heritage legacies materials has been provided through the Global Cotton Connections project. Thanks to all the volunteers who gave so generously of their time, effort and skills to make these outputs possible.

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4 thoughts on “Celebrating the cotton heritage legacy materials of collaborating community groups

  1. In my opinion the documentary film reflect a worthwhile experience for all who had participated and for others viewing the film whose levels of awareness were amplified as a result of the project exploring the connections of the slave trade and the connections with cotton.

  2. Pingback: Global Cotton Connections of the Derwent Valley: creative reflections | Derbyshire Record Office

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